Me & Most Defiantly.
not-figured-out:

and-you-still-dont-care:

fucking hurts, so bad

Literally bawling right now.

not-figured-out:

and-you-still-dont-care:

fucking hurts, so bad

Literally bawling right now.

8bitfuture:

Photo: Orange battery.
The orange has a tiny light bulb inside, which is powered by a chemical reaction between citric acid and the zinc nails inserted into each wedge. The current was so weak that it required a 14 hour exposure to get this photo.
Check out more of the series by Caleb Charland here.

8bitfuture:

Photo: Orange battery.

The orange has a tiny light bulb inside, which is powered by a chemical reaction between citric acid and the zinc nails inserted into each wedge. The current was so weak that it required a 14 hour exposure to get this photo.

Check out more of the series by Caleb Charland here.

unseenphotofair:

Joe Frazier on 15 May 1971 at the Rembrandtplein, not to box but to sing with The Knockouts. Het Parool, November 8, 2011 © Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin/Galerie Gabriel Rolt

unseenphotofair:

Joe Frazier on 15 May 1971 at the Rembrandtplein, not to box but to sing with The Knockouts. Het Parool, November 8, 2011 © Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin/Galerie Gabriel Rolt

8bitfuture:

Museum of Modern Art adds video games to permanent collection.
New York’s Museum of Modern Art has added 14 video games to its permanent collection, with plans to acquire even more. The games will be shown in the department of architecture and design from next March, and will be playable by visitors.

“Are video games art?” Antonelli, a senior curator at the museum, wrote in a blog post announcing the acquisitions. “They sure are, but they are also design, and a design approach is what we chose for this new foray into this universe.”

The collection isn’t all classic arcade games, with a few more recent games including iPhone/Android favourite Canabalt making the list:
• Pac-Man (1980)• Tetris (1984)• Another World (1991)• Myst (1993)• SimCity 2000 (1994)• vib-ribbon (1999)• The Sims (2000)• Katamari Damacy (2004)• EVE Online (2003)• Dwarf Fortress (2006)• Portal (2007)• flOw (2006)• Passage (2008)• Canabalt (2009)

8bitfuture:

Museum of Modern Art adds video games to permanent collection.

New York’s Museum of Modern Art has added 14 video games to its permanent collection, with plans to acquire even more. The games will be shown in the department of architecture and design from next March, and will be playable by visitors.

“Are video games art?” Antonelli, a senior curator at the museum, wrote in a blog post announcing the acquisitions. “They sure are, but they are also design, and a design approach is what we chose for this new foray into this universe.”

The collection isn’t all classic arcade games, with a few more recent games including iPhone/Android favourite Canabalt making the list:

 Pac-Man (1980)
• Tetris (1984)
• Another World (1991)
• Myst (1993)
• SimCity 2000 (1994)
• vib-ribbon (1999)
• The Sims (2000)
• Katamari Damacy (2004)
• EVE Online (2003)
• Dwarf Fortress (2006)
• Portal (2007)
• flOw (2006)
• Passage (2008)
• Canabalt (2009)

madewithpaper:

Hanging on by a thread…
by artisticdorkdoodles:

This took a while, I was so tired by the time I finished it last night I forgot to post it!

madewithpaper:

Hanging on by a thread…

by artisticdorkdoodles:

This took a while, I was so tired by the time I finished it last night I forgot to post it!

smarterplanet:

In Eye Control, A Promise To Let Your Tablet Go Hands-Free : All Tech Considered : NPR
The open-source software produced by the Gaze Group uses infrared light to track the pupils of users’ eyes, allowing them to control the cursor on a mobile or desktop computer.

smarterplanet:

In Eye Control, A Promise To Let Your Tablet Go Hands-Free : All Tech Considered : NPR

The open-source software produced by the Gaze Group uses infrared light to track the pupils of users’ eyes, allowing them to control the cursor on a mobile or desktop computer.

smarterplanet:

ReadWrite – Ubislate 7Ci: Can This $20 Tablet Really Change The World?
In all the competitive battles that have defined the history of the technology revolution, one essential truth almost always determines the outcome: cheap and good enough beats awesome but expensive every time.
It happened when PCs beat out minicomputers (not to mention Macintosh’s). It happened when VHS killed Betamax. It happened when Linux pushed aside proprietary server operating systems. It’s happening now as Google’s Android overtakes Apple’s iOS.
Good Enough?
And it could be about to happen again with the Ubislate 7Ci tablet. This Android device is far from special in just about every respect. The specs are ordinary at best:
7-inch, 800 x 432 capacitive touchscreen
Android 4.04 Ice Cream Sandwich
1GHz Cortex A8 ARMv7 CPU
512MB RAM, 4GB storage
Wi-Fi (a version with GPRS cellular capability is also available)
VGA front-facing camera
Micro SD slot
Power, micro-USB, and headphone connectors
The speaker is tinny. The pictures are grainy and low-res, and the colors are off, too. The screen has to be held just so to be seen properly. Battery life is listed as a measly 3 hours, and in my tests the device couldn’t hold a charge more than a day or two no matter how little it was used. Performance is painfully slow for anyone spoiled by the latest tablets from Apple, Samsung, Microsoft and others. Things that should happen instantly take several seconds or more, and I experienced frequent hangups and glitches. 
But build quality seems solid, and the thing is perfectly portable. Most important, though, it works - and it’s being sold for just $20 in India.

smarterplanet:

ReadWrite – Ubislate 7Ci: Can This $20 Tablet Really Change The World?

In all the competitive battles that have defined the history of the technology revolution, one essential truth almost always determines the outcome: cheap and good enough beats awesome but expensive every time.

It happened when PCs beat out minicomputers (not to mention Macintosh’s). It happened when VHS killed Betamax. It happened when Linux pushed aside proprietary server operating systems. It’s happening now as Google’s Android overtakes Apple’s iOS.

Good Enough?

And it could be about to happen again with the Ubislate 7Ci tablet. This Android device is far from special in just about every respect. The specs are ordinary at best:

  • 7-inch, 800 x 432 capacitive touchscreen
  • Android 4.04 Ice Cream Sandwich
  • 1GHz Cortex A8 ARMv7 CPU
  • 512MB RAM, 4GB storage
  • Wi-Fi (a version with GPRS cellular capability is also available)
  • VGA front-facing camera
  • Micro SD slot
  • Power, micro-USB, and headphone connectors

The speaker is tinny. The pictures are grainy and low-res, and the colors are off, too. The screen has to be held just so to be seen properly. Battery life is listed as a measly 3 hours, and in my tests the device couldn’t hold a charge more than a day or two no matter how little it was used. Performance is painfully slow for anyone spoiled by the latest tablets from Apple, Samsung, Microsoft and others. Things that should happen instantly take several seconds or more, and I experienced frequent hangups and glitches. 

But build quality seems solid, and the thing is perfectly portable. Most important, though, it works - and it’s being sold for just $20 in India.